Posts Tagged ‘keyword research’

Web Social Marketing Strategies for Writers Week 5: Market Samurai

Recent Web Social Marketing Strategies blog entries have summarized the meetings of Susquehanna Writers Internet Marketing (SWIM). This group of writers meets weekly in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania to learn techniques that can build Internet presence and promote their works online.

I can’t overemphasize the importance of this fundamental social marketing strategy: TWEET!!! Writers’ Digest’s recent issue has a whole bunch about social media… the writing industry is catching up with us. As the word gets out and more writers break away from traditional approaches to getting attention, it will be harder and harder to build a presence that stands apart from the crowd. WE SHOULD ALL HAVE our presences well-established before the writing & publishing industries figure all this stuff out!!! In 15 minutes a day, you can seriously build up a social network on Twitter and make a place for yourself online. So, TWEET! (Please?)

Questions About Social Marketing Strategies

A few questions had come up from one or another participant through the week. We talked about them as a group in case anyone else had run into the same issues:

Spam Robots: Terrible Social Marketing Strategies

The more involved you are with Twitter, the more likely it is you’ll attract spam robots. A spam robot is software programmed to watch the Twitter stream for specific key phrases. If one of your tweets happens to contain a phrase for which a robot is watching, the robot may follow you. In some cases, a robot doesn’t follow, it just sends an unsolicited suggestion of a link it wants you to follow; that’s pure spam and it’s good practice to report such activity.

You can report spam quietly if you follow @spam on Twitter (go to http://www.twitter.com/spam and click the follow button). @spam will follow you back. Then, when you receive a spam message (someone you don’t follow sends you a link), report the spammer by writing a direct message to spam. I usually write something like this:

d spam Please review activity of @spamrobot Looks a lot like a spam robot to me. Thanks!

If the robot follows you without spamming you, you’ll be able to tell fairly easily. Consider the checklist I published in “Why I Didn’t Follow You Back” You can usually spot a robot simply by the “New Follower” email message you get from Twitter. But sometimes you might need to click through to the new follower’s Twitter page and evaluate the twitter stream to decide if you’ve been followed by a robot.

I argue: Ignore the robot. Let it follow you unless its Twitter stream is morally objectionable. Having more followers than people you follow isn’t a bad thing. If you don’t want a particular follower paying attention to you, you can block that follower.

Spam robots must work or there wouldn’t be so many of them; what’s so bad about them? You’re building a SOCIAL network so you need to be a real person. Real people tend not to care for spam robots. You want people to get to know you and your work, not some software-produced drivel.

Keyword Versus Key Phrase?

What’s the difference between a key word and a key phrase? The number of space characters. I’m afraid I use the terms interchangeably, as does much of the Internet marketing industry. However, when you’re starting a web site or blog, these days you’re most likely not going to find a one-word key phrase on which to optimize. It would be terrific to be in position 1 on Google for a word such as faith, happiness, writing, or whatever, but getting there could require life-time commitment and prove very expensive.

So… in searching for a key phrase for which we’re more likely to rank well, we start with a very broad idea that may be just a word. Then we ask Google for suggestions and research those suggestions until we find a good phrase or two or three that meet the established Internet marketing targets.

Those targets, again, are:

  • 80 or more people each day click a link in Google as a result of a search for that key phrase.
  • There are fewer than 30,000 web pages on the Internet that have the exact phrase in them.
  • There is decent correlation between the “phrase match” and the “broad match.” That is, when people search using the words in your search phrase, do they use the exact phrase, or do they use a phrase that simply contains the same words?

Our big push for the day was to download Market Samurai and use it to do some key phrase research. We had some problems, but eventually three out of four computers had new installations running. People had brought candidate key phrases and we plugged these into the software to see where they’d lead. I’m not publishing key phrases here, but I will reveal that we each were searching in distinct areas. No one found a clear winner on Wednesday, but I hope everyone became comfortable with Market Samurai so they can continue their research at home.

Market Samurai Procedures

Start a project – We entered a key phrase for the project in the keyword box, and accepted the default project title and file path (which Market Samurai filled in when we typed a keyword. Then we clicked Create to start a new project.

Generate key phrases – We clicked the Keyword Research button on Market Samurai’s main screen…

…and then clicked the Generate Keywords button on the Keyword Research screen. Market Samurai prompted with a captcha dialog, and after completing it, we watched the keyword list box fill with suggested key phrases.

I encouraged you to pare down the list of key phrases; eliminate phrases that obviously don’t suit your intentions. I like to get the list down to 30-to-50 phrases. You remove a phrase by clicking the X to the right of the phrase. If there are phrases you want to include in your list but Market Samurai hasn’t suggested them, type them into the box labeled Add Keywords. Type one phrase to a line, and when you’ve typed all that interest you, click the Add Keywords button below the box. When the list of key phrases feels right, click the Analyze Keywords button at the bottom of the Market Samurai window. Market Samurai presents a second Keyword Research screen:

Evaluate the key phrases The box near the top of the Keyword Research page reveals settings that determine what data Market Samurai will load into the list box below. There’s already some data in that list box, but we wanted a bit more. The settings I like are as follows:

Note that I had to check the Total Searches box, change the SEO Traffic box from 80 to 0, change the Phrase-to-Broad box from 15% to 0, and change the SEO Comp box from 30000 to 3000000. Once you have the settings the way you want, click the Analyze Keywords button. It may take a few minutes, but eventually the list box fills with data:

To see items in order from highest traffic to lowest traffic, click the header of the SEOT column. Scan down this column for numbers greater than 80. In the adjacent PBR column, look for a number that is 15 or greater. In the SEOC column, look for a number that is 30,000 or lower. When you find all 3 in one row, the associated keyword may be a keeper.

Find more key phrases If you don’t find a key phrase that meets these criteria, use a few of the big SEOT key phrases to open a new tab in Market Samurai. To do this, click the key to the left of the keyword in the keyword list. Then click the new tab to activate it and use the first Keyword Research page to search for more, different key phrases that might meet the criteria.

You can save a project (pull down the File menu), but in my experience Market Samurai saves automatically, so you never have to save.

For next Wednesday, everyone should have a short list of very promising key phrases they’d be willing to use in their blogs. We’ll use Market Samurai to research the competition for those key phrases and decide whether we’ll be able to “beat” the competition’s Google listings if we do our SEO properly.

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